Apulia

Description

Description

Puglia is instantly recognizable as the boot heel of the Italian peninsula. Its topography, which is mostly flat and encircled by the Adriatic and Ionian seas, is reminiscent of Greece or North Africa with its vegetation dominated by Mediterranean maquis and white-washed adobe houses. The region’s iron-rich soil is ideal for wheat, wine and olive oil production. Thanks to the qualitative potential of its wines and competitive production costs, Puglia’s wine industry has experienced a resurgence in recent years. Several major Italian and foreign vineyards have recently sought to settle in the area to benefit from the commercial popularity of its wines, which can be produced relatively cheaply. While the region boasts 25 DOC zones, a distinction is generally made between its two main production areas, north and south, which are divided by an imaginary border that lies somewhere between the towns of Brindisi and Taranto. To the north, the red wines of the Castel del Monte DOC, made from Uva di Troia, Bombino Nero, Sangiovese and Montepulciano grapes, tend to garner the most recognition. The region’s best whites are mostly produced with Bombino Bianco, Verdeca, Malvasia and Trebbiano, in the Itria valley near the towns of Locorotondo and Martina Franca. South of the isthmus, in Salento, viticulturists favour Negroamaro and Primitivo grapes, which are present in nearly every DOC in the area. Research conducted at the University of California at Davis demonstrated that the Primitivo grape variety is indeed genetically related to its cousin, the American Zinfandel.

Wines

Flagship Wine Grapes

  • Aleatico
  • Bianco di Alessano
  • Bombino Nero
  • Greco bianco
  • Malvasia bianca
  • Montepulciano
  • Negroamaro
  • Primitivo
  • Sangiovese

Flagship Wine Appellations

  • Barletta DOC
  • Castel del Monte Bombino Nero DOCG
  • Gravina DOC
  • IGT Salento
  • Primitivo di Manduria Dolce Naturale DOCG

Vitivinicoles activities in the region

Wine and food pairing

Discovery ride

Wine Tasting

Puglia is instantly recognizable as the boot heel of the Italian peninsula. Its topography, which is mostly flat and encircled by the Adriatic and Ionian seas, is reminiscent of Greece or North Africa with its vegetation dominated by Mediterranean maquis and white-washed adobe houses. The region’s iron-rich soil is ideal for wheat, wine and olive oil production. Thanks to the qualitative potential of its wines and competitive production costs, Puglia’s wine industry has experienced a resurgence in recent years. Several major Italian and foreign vineyards have recently sought to settle in the area to benefit from the commercial popularity of its wines, which can be produced relatively cheaply. While the region boasts 25 DOC zones, a distinction is generally made between its two main production areas, north and south, which are divided by an imaginary border that lies somewhere between the towns of Brindisi and Taranto. To the north, the red wines of the Castel del Monte DOC, made from Uva di Troia, Bombino Nero, Sangiovese and Montepulciano grapes, tend to garner the most recognition. The region’s best whites are mostly produced with Bombino Bianco, Verdeca, Malvasia and Trebbiano, in the Itria valley near the towns of Locorotondo and Martina Franca. South of the isthmus, in Salento, viticulturists favour Negroamaro and Primitivo grapes, which are present in nearly every DOC in the area. Research conducted at the University of California at Davis demonstrated that the Primitivo grape variety is indeed genetically related to its cousin, the American Zinfandel.

Flagship Wine Grapes

  • Aleatico
  • Bianco di Alessano
  • Bombino Nero
  • Greco bianco
  • Malvasia bianca
  • Montepulciano
  • Negroamaro
  • Primitivo
  • Sangiovese

Flagship Wine Appellations

  • Barletta DOC
  • Castel del Monte Bombino Nero DOCG
  • Gravina DOC
  • IGT Salento
  • Primitivo di Manduria Dolce Naturale DOCG

Vitivinicoles activities in the region

Wine and food pairing

Discovery ride

Wine Tasting

Vineyards