Apulia

Description

Description

Discover – Southern Warmth

At the heel of Italy’s boot, Puglia is one of the country’s most culturally and geographically distinct regions. Often resembling the parched landscapes of Greece or Malta, Puglia’s sun drenched countryside provides escapism in ample doses. Inhabited by native populations since times immemorial, and later colonized by Greek settlers and Roman rulers, this portion of Magna Graecia is nowadays a top-notch destination within Southern Italy. While not as remote as Calabria and lacking Campania’s freneticism, Puglia is a treasure trove for discerned travelers looking for an alternative to Italy’s more crowded regions. With its distinct conical Trulli farmhouses and fortified Masseria estates, Puglia’s countryside is a most uncharted asset, convincing naysayers who often overlook the region for more conventional tourist outposts.

Puglia’s capital, Bari, is a hub for those looking to venture across the Adriatic, retaining many of its Norman and Swabian roots, with the Castello Normanno-Svevo watching over the city from its cliffside perch, a fascinating reminder of the region’s storied past. Bari Vecchia provides a more traditional look at the coastal city, with narrow streets and many historic churches in or around the area.

The city of Lecce, often termed as the Florence of the South, provides an ample dose of Renaissance culture for those missing the more art-centric north. Replete with spectacular churches and 17th century Palazzi, this is the only such center within Southern Italy. The Basilica di Santa Croce and the Chiesa di Santa Chiara both provide great examples of Baroque architecture, hence its fame as the capital of Baroque.

The Parco Nazionale del Gargano national park, near the Abruzzo border and North of Foggia, is home to the Forest Umbra, one of the oldest forests in Italy and since 2017 a UNESCO World Heritage Site thanks to its ancient beech woods. Visiting the park is a great opportunity to picnic or hike its countless trails.

Visit – Sun, Sea and Grapes

With a marked geographical difference between the North and South of Puglia, winemaking distinctively reflects the environmental divide. The more northern half, bordering Molise and Abruzzo, shares many of the same appellations and winemaking traditions as much of Italy, however it’s the Southern half of Puglia that truly stands out as a unique wine terroir. It’s here that the Primitivo and Negroamaro grape varieties thrive, bathed in the intense Apulian sun.

Taste – Local Flavors and Rustic Traditions

Travelers to Puglia should not miss a visit to the Orecchiette ladies in Bari Vecchia. Situated in the old town’s alleyways, women hand make the ear-shaped pasta on long wooden tables, showcasing products by their doorstep. The process has passed down across generations, proving the importance that culinary traditions play within Italian families, much to the delight of hungry tourists.

With most of local agriculture composed of olive oil and grapes, it’s no surprise that one of the area’s popular breads is baked with olive oil. Frisella, a dry bread that is traditionally dipped in oil, has acted as a form of sustenance for the region’s agricultural workers in the past, and makes for a great accompaniment to a bowl of Orecchiette.

Wines

Flagship Wine Grapes

  • Aleatico
  • Bianco di Alessano
  • Bombino Nero
  • Greco bianco
  • Malvasia bianca
  • Montepulciano
  • Negroamaro
  • Primitivo
  • Sangiovese

Flagship Wine Appellations

  • Barletta DOC
  • Castel del Monte Bombino Nero DOCG
  • Gravina DOC
  • IGT Salento
  • Primitivo di Manduria Dolce Naturale DOCG
  • Salice Salentino DOC

Vitivinicoles activities in the region

Wine and food pairing

Discovery ride

Wine Tasting

Discover – Southern Warmth

At the heel of Italy’s boot, Puglia is one of the country’s most culturally and geographically distinct regions. Often resembling the parched landscapes of Greece or Malta, Puglia’s sun drenched countryside provides escapism in ample doses. Inhabited by native populations since times immemorial, and later colonized by Greek settlers and Roman rulers, this portion of Magna Graecia is nowadays a top-notch destination within Southern Italy. While not as remote as Calabria and lacking Campania’s freneticism, Puglia is a treasure trove for discerned travelers looking for an alternative to Italy’s more crowded regions. With its distinct conical Trulli farmhouses and fortified Masseria estates, Puglia’s countryside is a most uncharted asset, convincing naysayers who often overlook the region for more conventional tourist outposts.

Puglia’s capital, Bari, is a hub for those looking to venture across the Adriatic, retaining many of its Norman and Swabian roots, with the Castello Normanno-Svevo watching over the city from its cliffside perch, a fascinating reminder of the region’s storied past. Bari Vecchia provides a more traditional look at the coastal city, with narrow streets and many historic churches in or around the area.

The city of Lecce, often termed as the Florence of the South, provides an ample dose of Renaissance culture for those missing the more art-centric north. Replete with spectacular churches and 17th century Palazzi, this is the only such center within Southern Italy. The Basilica di Santa Croce and the Chiesa di Santa Chiara both provide great examples of Baroque architecture, hence its fame as the capital of Baroque.

The Parco Nazionale del Gargano national park, near the Abruzzo border and North of Foggia, is home to the Forest Umbra, one of the oldest forests in Italy and since 2017 a UNESCO World Heritage Site thanks to its ancient beech woods. Visiting the park is a great opportunity to picnic or hike its countless trails.

Visit – Sun, Sea and Grapes

With a marked geographical difference between the North and South of Puglia, winemaking distinctively reflects the environmental divide. The more northern half, bordering Molise and Abruzzo, shares many of the same appellations and winemaking traditions as much of Italy, however it’s the Southern half of Puglia that truly stands out as a unique wine terroir. It’s here that the Primitivo and Negroamaro grape varieties thrive, bathed in the intense Apulian sun.

Taste – Local Flavors and Rustic Traditions

Travelers to Puglia should not miss a visit to the Orecchiette ladies in Bari Vecchia. Situated in the old town’s alleyways, women hand make the ear-shaped pasta on long wooden tables, showcasing products by their doorstep. The process has passed down across generations, proving the importance that culinary traditions play within Italian families, much to the delight of hungry tourists.

With most of local agriculture composed of olive oil and grapes, it’s no surprise that one of the area’s popular breads is baked with olive oil. Frisella, a dry bread that is traditionally dipped in oil, has acted as a form of sustenance for the region’s agricultural workers in the past, and makes for a great accompaniment to a bowl of Orecchiette.

Flagship Wine Grapes

  • Aleatico
  • Bianco di Alessano
  • Bombino Nero
  • Greco bianco
  • Malvasia bianca
  • Montepulciano
  • Negroamaro
  • Primitivo
  • Sangiovese

Flagship Wine Appellations

  • Barletta DOC
  • Castel del Monte Bombino Nero DOCG
  • Gravina DOC
  • IGT Salento
  • Primitivo di Manduria Dolce Naturale DOCG
  • Salice Salentino DOC

Vitivinicoles activities in the region

Wine and food pairing

Discovery ride

Wine Tasting

Vineyards