Aosta Valley

Description

Description

Perched on the mountains of northwestern Italy lies Aosta Valley, the Bel paese’s smallest region. Nestled between the Swiss, French and Italian Alps, Aosta Valley is a land where viticulture is more of an extreme sport than a sensible endeavour. With scant arable land, the region’s vines must be grown in rock terraces on forbidding alpine slopes at heights reaching 1200 meters above sea level (Europe’s highest vineyards). With only 120,000 inhabitants, this region produces less wine by volume than anywhere else in Italy. In fact, only twenty commercial cellars and dedicated wine cooperatives operate in Aosta Valley. Like many other parts of northern Italy, it is somewhat surprising that Aosta Valley focuses to such an extent on red wines. Nevertheless, its light and fruity Beaujolais-style wines go quite well with the region’s cuisine. Overall, Aosta Valley wines, which feature blends and single varietals, are as unique as the local dialect. Long ruled by the Savoyards, the region still maintains a bilingual character, reflected most notably in the fact that the labels for its 23 DOCs are written in French. Even though Fumin, which vaguely resembles Syrah, and Petit Rouge are the region’s two most common grape varieties, its winemakers still call upon a wide range of Italian, French and Swiss grapes, the most well-known being Picotendro, a local version of Nebbiolo. But, to sample a wider variety of the region’s production, it is best to travel there because it exports very little wine abroad.

Wines

Flagship Wine Grapes

  • Chardonnay
  • Fumin
  • Gamay
  • Müller-Thurgau
  • Petit Rouge
  • Picotendro

Flagship Wine Appellations

  • Valle d’Aosta DOC

Vitivinicoles activities in the region

Wine and food pairing

Discovery ride

Discovery ride

Perched on the mountains of northwestern Italy lies Aosta Valley, the Bel paese’s smallest region. Nestled between the Swiss, French and Italian Alps, Aosta Valley is a land where viticulture is more of an extreme sport than a sensible endeavour. With scant arable land, the region’s vines must be grown in rock terraces on forbidding alpine slopes at heights reaching 1200 meters above sea level (Europe’s highest vineyards). With only 120,000 inhabitants, this region produces less wine by volume than anywhere else in Italy. In fact, only twenty commercial cellars and dedicated wine cooperatives operate in Aosta Valley. Like many other parts of northern Italy, it is somewhat surprising that Aosta Valley focuses to such an extent on red wines. Nevertheless, its light and fruity Beaujolais-style wines go quite well with the region’s cuisine. Overall, Aosta Valley wines, which feature blends and single varietals, are as unique as the local dialect. Long ruled by the Savoyards, the region still maintains a bilingual character, reflected most notably in the fact that the labels for its 23 DOCs are written in French. Even though Fumin, which vaguely resembles Syrah, and Petit Rouge are the region’s two most common grape varieties, its winemakers still call upon a wide range of Italian, French and Swiss grapes, the most well-known being Picotendro, a local version of Nebbiolo. But, to sample a wider variety of the region’s production, it is best to travel there because it exports very little wine abroad.

Flagship Wine Grapes

  • Chardonnay
  • Fumin
  • Gamay
  • Müller-Thurgau
  • Petit Rouge
  • Picotendro

Flagship Wine Appellations

  • Valle d’Aosta DOC

Vitivinicoles activities in the region

Wine and food pairing

Discovery ride

Discovery ride