Lombardy

Description

Description

Although it has one of the most successful agricultural industries in the country, Lombardy is not a huge wine producer. That being said, this northern Italian region, which is divided into three sub-regions, possesses a rich and varied landscape that is quite amenable to vineyards. Valtellina, further north, at the foot of the Alps by the Swiss border, is a terraced vineyard that resembles the neighbouring areas of Val d'Aosta or Alto Adige. The preferred grape for this rugged landscape is Nebbiolo that yields, in this environment, a more discreet and feminine bouquet than does a typical Piedmontese wine that uses the same variety. Vinification in the region also follows the Valtellina appasimento method (partially dried grapes), under the Sfursat or Sforzato appellation, in a style reminiscent of Amarone wines. To the south, near Pavia, in the Oltrepò Pavese area, one finds light red wines made from Pinot Noir and several sparkling whites that are hugely popular in Milan. The region also produces promising reds based on local varieties, like Barbera and Bonarda. The region’s central area, between Bergamo and Lake Garda, is home to most of Lombardy’s 22 DOCs and 5 DOCGs, including Franciacorta, whose wines are increasingly popular. Influenced by the legendary Lombardi knack for business, the Franciacorta area has dramatically increased its output in recent decades. In addition to offering some of the best sparkling wine from Italy, this region has also become one of the poshest tourist destinations in the country.

Wines

Flagship Wine Grapes

  • Chardonnay
  • Chiavennasca
  • Nebbiolo
  • Pinot Bianco
  • Pinot Grigio
  • Pinot Nero

Flagship Wine Appellations

  • Curtefranca DOC
  • Franciacorta DOCG
  • Oltrepo Pavese DOC
  • Oltrepò Pavese Metodo Classico DOCG
  • Sforzato di Valtellina DOCG

Vitivinicoles activities in the region

Wine and food pairing

Wine Tasting

Discovery ride

Although it has one of the most successful agricultural industries in the country, Lombardy is not a huge wine producer. That being said, this northern Italian region, which is divided into three sub-regions, possesses a rich and varied landscape that is quite amenable to vineyards. Valtellina, further north, at the foot of the Alps by the Swiss border, is a terraced vineyard that resembles the neighbouring areas of Val d'Aosta or Alto Adige. The preferred grape for this rugged landscape is Nebbiolo that yields, in this environment, a more discreet and feminine bouquet than does a typical Piedmontese wine that uses the same variety. Vinification in the region also follows the Valtellina appasimento method (partially dried grapes), under the Sfursat or Sforzato appellation, in a style reminiscent of Amarone wines. To the south, near Pavia, in the Oltrepò Pavese area, one finds light red wines made from Pinot Noir and several sparkling whites that are hugely popular in Milan. The region also produces promising reds based on local varieties, like Barbera and Bonarda. The region’s central area, between Bergamo and Lake Garda, is home to most of Lombardy’s 22 DOCs and 5 DOCGs, including Franciacorta, whose wines are increasingly popular. Influenced by the legendary Lombardi knack for business, the Franciacorta area has dramatically increased its output in recent decades. In addition to offering some of the best sparkling wine from Italy, this region has also become one of the poshest tourist destinations in the country.

Flagship Wine Grapes

  • Chardonnay
  • Chiavennasca
  • Nebbiolo
  • Pinot Bianco
  • Pinot Grigio
  • Pinot Nero

Flagship Wine Appellations

  • Curtefranca DOC
  • Franciacorta DOCG
  • Oltrepo Pavese DOC
  • Oltrepò Pavese Metodo Classico DOCG
  • Sforzato di Valtellina DOCG

Vitivinicoles activities in the region

Wine and food pairing

Wine Tasting

Discovery ride

Vineyards